Ron Maine Event Video!

February 26, 2010

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHCUPDNhNt8

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Intro to Color Blind Event Video

February 26, 2010

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-maMVTgO7BU


More on Bob Rue….

February 23, 2010

Robert (Bob) R. Rue, MS
Adjunct Faculty
Department of Organization & Management

Highest Degree
MS, Antioch University New England
Other Degrees and Credentials:
Certification in Organization Development, National Training Laboratories for Applied Behavioral Science (NTL Institute)
BA in Industrial Arts, Kent State University
Defense Race Relations Institute (now known as the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute)
Executive Personality Dynamics for Coaches, Gestalt International Study Center

Overview

As an adjunct faculty member in the department of Organization and Management, I teach Organizational Change Models and Applications in the fall semester and Organizational Strategy and Decision-Making in the spring semester.
My areas of interest are leadership development, self-managing teams, strategic planning and execution, large group interventions, board development, group dynamics and facilitation, adult learning, process consultation, interpersonal communication, and presentation skills. I have had my own consulting firm since 1986 and work with clients in the commercial, not-for-profit, collegiate, and governmental sectors.

Some sample projects include:

A three year project for a $17 billion U.S. Air Force program acquisition office resulting in the last nine aircraft being delivered to the government ahead of schedule and below budget;
Consulted to (and trained) a 150 person self-managing teleservicing team for a major life insurance company;
Coached two Chief Executive Officers in their presentations before potential shareholders prior to their respective, successful initial public stock offerings, and;
Coached the CEO of a major public utility in his successful testimony before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.


Bob Rue Presentation Skills Workshop

February 23, 2010

Net Impact invites you to join Bob Rue of ANE for a workshop on presentation skills. In today’s business environment good presentation skills are a required skill set. How do you communicate with confidence and develop trust with your audience? How do you keep them engaged to ensure your information gets across?

Where: Antioch University New England

40 Avon Street
Keene, NH 03431

Room TBA

When: Friday March 12, 2010

11 am – 12:30 pm

Contact: John Costa

(301) 257-5654

Sasha Purpura

The event is free and open to all ANE Green MBA students. Please RSVP for the event by March 8, 2010. Look for an Email invite coming soon!

Bob Rue will be conducting a workshop on honing your presentation skills to communicate your message with clarity. A good speaker can reduce the audience’s anxiety and opposition while developing trust. The workshop will focus on topic introduction, distilling complex information, presenting naturally vs reading a script or using notes, guiding the audience, and closing-out a presentation with impact.

About Bob Rue:

Bob is currently an adjunct faculty member in the department of Organization & Management here at Antioch. He teaches Organizational Change Models and Applications in the fall semester and Organizational Strategy and Decision-Making in the spring semester. His areas of interest are leadership development, self-managing teams, strategic planning and execution, large group interventions, board development, group dynamics and facilitation, adult learning, process consultation, interpersonal communication, and presentation skills.

Bob co-founder of Myers Rue Training & Consulting. His clients are in the commercial, not-for-profit, collegiate, and public sector. He has consulted and coached CEOs before major public events such as initial public stock offerings and testimony before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
Bob has an MS from Antioch and a BA in Industrial Arts from Kent State University. His other credentials include a Certification in Organization Development from the National Training Laboratories for Applied Behavioral Science (NTL Institute).


Communicating Green!

February 21, 2010

Hosted by Antioch University New England Net Impact, a discussion with Mark Bates of the Continuum Design Consultancy and Jeff Rosen of Antioch University New England for a morning exploring issues of communication facing social purpose businesses in today’s marketplace was held the morning of February 12th. The objective of the event was “How can businesses translate their message of sustainability to consumers and investors in order to find success?” Many students in the Antioch Green MBA program, professors, and local entrepreneurs attended. Video of the event available soon!
For a Slideshow of photos click here!


Post Event: A few notes from our Dave…

February 16, 2010

Hello all,

Thank you for the opportunity to spend the early hours of Saturday evening with you at the Net Impact event at E.F. Lane’s – I had a great time (well, with the possible exception of the pompous windbag who spoke – who was that guy?!)…

I’ve had a couple of requests to restate the main points I made (and made… and made…) in my remarks, so here goes:

1. “Guiding Precepts” of a career: We all have ’em, whether or not we have yet actually articulated them for ourselves. If you’re wondering if you have done this, dig out your personal mission statement from earlier in your ANE voyage and take a look – chances are, they’re looking back at you in some form or other. These may change continuously for you throughout your career journey or they may be the same for the entire time. I’m still living and working with the ones I set for myself 25+ years ago (with periodic edits to the language used). This may mean I got ’em right for myself at an early stage of things or it may mean I have a alarming lack of imagination, self-honesty, or personal growth. In any case, if you can get clear on what these are for yourself, you will create a really useful career compass that you can pull out and consult whenever you’re trying to figure out what job may be next for you and how the fit may be.

2. Make sense of your personal career story – and then don’t be afraid to tell it (I obviously am not…): One of the best parts about my job is the opportunity to get to know a bit about each of you through your application materials long before we ever meet in person. The stories of your respective careers are absolutely fascinating and the journeys you have taken, regardless of how long you’ve been around to take them, are amazing ones. Resumes and CV’s are the Readers Digest Condensed Books of otherwise great tales – fast, easy reads that are ultimately not particularly satisfying in getting the reader to “the really good parts of the story”. Figure out creative ways to introduce prospective employers to at least some elements of your career story – you owe it to them to at least give them a peek at the “unabridged version” of you.

3. Networking as ends first and means second: I am probably not a particularly effective networker by the standards of the 21st century, as I don’t view the process first, foremost, or fundamentally as the accumulation of shrunken heads on my belt (or links in my LinkedIn account, as the e-case may be). I try to do my best to connect to and relate with people (or not) because I want to connect to and relate with people (or not) and that this remains the primary focus of my “networking” (really looking forward to the ultimate sunset of that word, by the way…). If, as a by-product of those connections and relationships, I can do something for someone I have connected with, or they for me, great. If not, also great – because the whole thing to me should be primarily about interactions and relationships with people as ends in and of themselves – and not primarily as means to other ends. There are plenty of folks who would classify me as a Neanderthal as a result of holding that philosophy – could well be, but I’m good with the cave I’m in and pretty much plan to stay there with the clan I’ve become a part of over the years.

4. A career versus 40+ years of a job (or jobs): One way to think of this (and not necessarily the only or best one by a long shot) is that career will be the ultimate sense you make of all of the jobs you worked for as long as you do so. You can approach this by doing whatever you want for work for as long as you want to do it and then sitting down at the kitchen table with a good pot of coffee when you’re all done with work forever and try to figure out how it all fit. (Note: You may need two pots for this…) Alternately, you can try to figure out what it is you’re trying to accomplish relative to meaning at the outset of work – or at least somewhere along the journey – and try to make whatever you wind up doing for a job or jobs fit that in some way. If living a “meaningful life” through your work (however you define that one for yourself) is important to you, I’d suggest the latter approach and not the former.

Chances are, you already know all of this – and likely a good bit more about it than I do or ever will – in which case John and Sasha would like to chat with you about speaking at an upcoming Net Impact Happy Hour…

Cheers,
Dave C.